20 Wilhelmina Stitch Poems

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Be inspired and encouraged by these poems by Wilhelmina Stitch. Wilhelmina Stitch was a pen name for Ruth Colie. She was born in Cambridge, England and moved to Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada where she started her writing career. She also used the pen name of Sheila Rand but in 1922 she started publishing her poetry for many different North American newspapers and at the time changed her pen name to Wilhelmina Stitch in November 1922.

Born in November 1888 she lived until she was 47 years old, dying on March 6, 1936. Her poems have inspired many over the years and still live on today. Share these poems by Wilhelmina Stitch with others. Verses full of wisdom and inspiration to add a positive thought to your day.


Wilhelmina Stitch
Wilhelmina Stitch


Favorite Poems by Wilhelmina Stitch:
1. The Little Roads To Happiness 2. Two Kinds of Discontent
3. Laughter and Tears 4. Later On
5. Just Don't Worry So There 6. God's Friday
7. Mountain Peace 8. Home Is Here
9. What So Wild As Words Are . . . 10. To New Baby
11. To A January Baby 12. The Happiest Age
13. The Gain


Popular Wilhelmina Stitch Short Poems:

  1. Books
    Poet: Wilhelmina Stitch


    A dozen people sitting in a train;
    Each face a book, where one can read a tale of joy or pain,
    If one but look. Lo! Life, the printer, through the passing years has marked each face.
    Sure signs of laughter and of bitter tears we now can trace.

    Each face is like a book that we can read - self set aside,
    Or self the slave of passion and of greed and scornful pride.
    Each face is like a book, a story told. This one, a man
    Spurred by ambition, restless, brave and bold - achieved his plan.

    Ah! There's a face that tells the sweetest story. Look at her eyes!
    She is beloved, and love, life's crowning glory, has made her wise.
    Her mouth is tender and its curve is sweet. Oh! Lovely page
    Wherein one reads a story quite complete - as old as age!



  2. The Mental Mint
    Poet: Wilhelmina Stitch


    Coins, beautiful and precious, are minted by the mind;
    Fantastic ones and pleasing, some bitter or unkind.
    Coins minted for the purpose of bartering each day-
    Each person to his liking in his especial way.

    Golden thoughts and silver, dreams and visions bright,
    These can buy us happiness to last from morn to night.
    Coins of purest metal, hope without alloy,
    Courage and ambition buy tremendous joy.

    Should we mint some base ones - envy, craven fear,
    We'll purchase naught but sorrow, and this will cost a dear.
    Mind! What are you minting? Thoughts of purest gold
    To buy a share of happiness when we are growing old.



  3. Others
    Poet: Wilhelmina Stitch


    A little word to play so big a part!
    It oft controls the hand and mind;
    it is the guardian of the heart.
    No stronger word we'll ever find
    Because of others, laziness will work;
    And selfishness retire in shame;
    And sadness sing, despite the gloom and muck;
    And high ambition turn away from fame.

    We are determined on a certain course
    And then, because of others, curb our will.
    Oh! little word, you have tremendous force
    To turn to goodness what we planned for ill.
    We must be brave that others will not fear;
    And when the face of trouble doth appear -
    Because of others, not a bit of fuss!

    The sweetest, tenderest thoughts, others inspire;
    The noblest actions are for others done;
    For others, burns the brightest of love's fire;
    For others are the hardest battles won.



  4. Every-day Religion
    Poet: Wilhelmina Stitch


    "An every-day religion." Ah! that's the sort we. need.
    It does not wait for Sunday in a deep and dark recess,
    But lives with us throughout each day in every thought and deed,
    And permeates our beings and brings us happiness.

    A genuine religion affecting every day;
    A living force within us expressed by what we do;
    The unseen good companion along the' hilly way,
    Uplifting us whene'er we. slip— a strong guide and a true.

    An every-day religion for our blessings and our sorrows,
    For our going out each morning and our coming-in each night;
    The balm for disappointments, the staff for great endeavour,
    The source of pure delight.

    An every-day religion transmuting homely things
    To witnesses proclaiming the power of the Divine;
    That binds us all together; gives the lowly heart strong wings;
    May an every-day religion for evermore be mine



  5. At Twilight
    Poet: Wilhelmina Stitch


    I would remember such and such a thing -
    Not the sharp stones along the weary road;
    Not the sharp words that used to cut and sting,
    Nor the increasing weight of each day's load.
    But this I would remember - the keen thrill
    When one could drop the burden of the day
    And stand with victory upon the hill
    And look down, exclaim: "I've come this way."

    I would forget when disappointment jeered,
    Unsheathed its sword and struck across the heart.
    I would forget the callous word that scared,
    The unkind hand that flung a poisoned dart.

    I would remember how a sunset's glow
    Drew all the sorrow from a jaded breast;
    And how a river's gentle, placid flow
    Could put the spirit's turbulence to rest.

    I would remember only precious things -
    How friendship never failed when skies grew black.
    How sweetly, lilac-time, gay Robin sings -
    Remembering thus, how pleasant to look back.



  6. Let The Heart Go
    Poet: Wilhelmina Stitch


    Unrein your heart, too-cautious one; let it gallop away.
    "Tis good for a heart to skip and run at least once a day.
    Heed not the folks who mutter, "Unwise."
    Remember! our hearts need exercise.

    Let the heart rush off with that word of praise that it longs to speak.
    Why bottle it up for hours, for days, perhaps for a week?
    Think of the joy that hearts withhold
    By being so prim and proper and cold.

    Let the heart rush off with that kindly deed that it longs to do.
    Why tarry awhile, and what is the need? Days are so few.
    Pale prudence may curb until it's too late;
    So gallop away, good heart, don't wait.

    That heart of yours - give it full rein. Let it gallop away.
    A loving heart is the balm for pain whatever the day.
    Be off, O heart, nor stay to hear
    Wan caution's voice or cynic's sneer.



  7. Self-Deception
    Poet: Wilhelmina Stitch


    How we deceive ourselves day after day!
    Saying, "We lack the time for things we'd like to do."
    Sighing, "Why do the hours so swiftly pass away?"
    (often I act like this, and so do you!)
    To view some pictures? Ah! we'd like to go,
    and also to a park where lilacs bloom.
    Not possible! So busy, as you know.
    This lack of time just steeps a soul in gloom!

    We have no time to take a daily walk,
    we haven't any time at all to read,
    or write the promised letter (how we talk!),
    no time to help another in dire need.

    One day old Time will let his anger fly
    and take us by the shoulders and shake hard.
    "You are to blame, not I!" he loudly cry.
    "I'll punish you for this, be your on your guard.
    It is not time you lack,
    But just the will to do the things you always leave undone."
    Ah! Time, you're right. Come paper, ink and quill -
    I'll write at once to mother and my son.
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