Poems about Children

Be inspired by these poems about what a child is. These short poems about children focus on how special each child is. They will remind you of the joy that children bring into our lives.

It was once said that "a baby will make love stronger, days shorter, nights longer, bankroll smaller, home happier, clothes shabbier, the past forgotten, and the future worth living for." These words are so true!

These are great poems to share with others. Or to use in congratulations or shower cards. You may also want to review our collection of children quotes.

Poems About Family    /  Baby Poems    /   Poems About Children


  1. A Child
    Poet Unknown


    A child is
    A butterfly in the wind,
    Some can fly higher than others;
    but each one flies the best it can.
    Why compare one against the other?

    Each one is different!
    Each one is special!
    Each one is beautiful!



  2. A Child Is
    Poet: Catherine Pulsifer, 2019


    A child is sunshine and happy things
    They show us it doesn't matter about things.

    A child can brighten a gloomy day
    Just by their innocence and what they say.

    A child keeps things simple not complex
    They couldn't care less if you have a Rolex.

    A child's excitement always shows
    Their laughter goes right to their toes.

    A child will love you, a love you will feel
    It is a true love that no one can steal.

    God sends us a child as a gift
    To remind us of love and give us a lift.



  3. a child poem


  4. Rosy-Cheek And Curly-Head
    Poet: Edgar Wade Abbot


    When I go home this welcome waits
    Each evening when the day is fled;
    The pattering of little feet,
    Then clinging arms and kisses sweet,
    From Rosy-cheek and Curly -head.

    They come with shouts of rioting;
    They're laughing so they scarce can speak!
    O pair of highwaymen are they;
    And I an easy-yielding prey
    To Curly-head and Rosy-cheek.

    But curly heads will sometimes ache,
    And fill our souls with sudden dread;
    And roses fade while hearts stand still.
    O, may there come no touch of ill
    To Rosy-cheek and Curly-head!

    God bless all little cheeks of rose!
    Where'er they bloom, they sunlight shed.
    Bless little heads of rippling hair!
    O, take into Thy tender care
    Each Rosy-cheek and Curly-head!



  5. Why We Do So
    Poet: Strickland Gillilan


    We talk to them when they're asleep -
    These tiny objects of our love!
    We murmur to them while we weep
    And call them each our treasure trove.

    We talk to them when they're asleep -
    Oh, wayward children that they are! -
    And hope that always we may keep
    Their feet from straying into far

    And thorn-girt paths beset with sin -
    That they may never, never reap
    Such harvesting as ours has been -
    We talk to them when they're asleep.

    Now do not bust right out and weep,
    Or let your cheeks with teardrops glisten;
    We talk to them when they're asleep
    'Cause that's the only time they'll listen.



  6. The Child's Heart
    Poet: Arthur Austin-Jackson


    The heart of a child,
    Like the heart of a flower,
    Has a smile for the sun
    And a tear for the shower:
    Oh, innocent hours
    With wonder beguiled
    Oh, heart like a flower's
    In the heart of a child!

    The heart of a child,
    Like the heart of a bird,
    With raptures of music
    Is flooded and stirred;
    Oh, songs without words,
    Oh, melodies wild
    Oh, heart like a bird's
    In the heart of a child!

    The heart of a child,
    Like the heart of the Spring,
    Is full of the hope
    Of what Summer shall bring:
    Oh, glory of things
    In a world undefiled
    Oh, heart like the Spring's
    In the heart of a child!



  7. Teach A Child
    Poet: James B. Wiggin


    When you first teach a child to understand
    Work means the loving heart and helping hand;
    When you first teach a youth to read and write
    You give the key to a lifelong delight.
    Who adds the charm of music to his days
    Attunes his soul to melody and praise.
    Who studies art enters the court serene,
    The enchanted land where Nature reigns a queen.
    Who loves all beauty doth a poet grow,
    And wins the highest joy that mortals know.



  8. The Children
    by Charles Dickens


    Oh, my heart grows weak as a woman's,
    And the fountains of feeling will flow,
    When I think of the paths steep and stony
    Where the feet of the dear ones must go.
    Of the mountains of sin hanging o'er them,
    Of the tempest of Fate blowing wild;
    Oh, there is nothing on earth so holy
    As the innocent heart of a child!

    They are idols of hearts and of households,
    They are angels of God in disguise;
    His sunlight still sleeps in their tresses,
    His glory still gleams in their eyes;
    Oh, those truants from home and from heaven,
    They have made me more manly and mild!
    And I know how Jesus could liken
    The kingdom of God to a child.

    I ask not for the dear ones,
    All radiant, as others have done.
    But that life may have just enough shadow
    To temper the glare of the sun;
    I would pray God to guard them from evil
    But my prayer would bound back to myself;
    Ah! a seraph may pray for a sinner,
    But a sinner must pray for himself.

    The twig is so easily bended,
    I have banished the rule and the rod,
    I have taught them the goodness of knowledge,
    They have taught me the goodness of God;
    My heart is a dungeon of darkness,
    Where I shut them from breaking a rule;
    My frown is sufficient correction;
    My love is the law of the school.

    I shall leave the old house in the Autumn,
    To traverse the threshold no more;
    Ah! how I shall sigh for the dear ones
    That meet me each morning at the door!
    I shall miss the "good-nights " and the kisses
    And the gush of their innocent glee,
    The group on the green, and the flowers
    That are brought every morning to me.

    I shall miss them at morning and at evening,
    Their song in the school and the street;
    I shall miss the low hum of their voices,
    And the tramp of their delicate feet.
    When the lessons and tasks are all ended,
    And death says, "The school is dismissed!"
    May the little ones gather around me,
    To bid me good-night and be kissed.



  9. Children
    Poet: Henry W. Longfellow


    Come to me, O ye Children!
    For I hear you at your play.
    And the questions that perplexed me
    Have vanished quite away.

    Ye open the eastern windows,
    That look toward the sun,
    Where the thoughts are singing swallows
    And the brooks of morning run.

    Your hearts are the birds and the sunshine,
    In your thoughts the brooklets flow,
    But in mine the wind of Autumn
    And the first fall of the snow.

    Ah! what would the world be to us
    If the Children were no more?
    We should dread the desert behind us
    Worse than the dark before.

    For what are our contrivings,
    And the wisdom of our books,
    When compared with your caresses,
    And the gladness of your looks?



  10. Tied Down
    Poet: Edgar A. Guest


    "They tie you down," a woman said,
    Whose cheeks should have been flaming red
    With shame to speak of children so.
    "When babies come you cannot go
    In search of pleasure with your friends
    And all your happy wandering ends.
    The things you like you cannot do
    For babies make a slave of you."

    I looked at her and said : "'Tis true
    That children make a slave of you,
    And tie you down with many a knot,
    But have you never thought to what
    It is of happiness and pride
    That little babies have you tied?
    Do you not miss the greater joys
    That come with little girls and boys?

    "They tie you down to laughter rare,
    To hours of smiles and hours of care,
    To nights of watching and to fears,
    Sometimes they tie you down to tears
    And then repay you with a smile
    And make your trouble all worth while.
    They tie you fast to chubby feet
    And cheeks of pink and kisses sweet.

    "They fasten you with cords of love
    To God divine who reigns above.
    They tie you, whereso'er you roam
    Unto the little place called home,
    And over sea or railroad track
    They tug at you to bring you back.
    The happiest people in the town
    Are those the babies have tied down.

    "Oh, go your selfish way and free
    But hampered I would rather be,
    Yes, rather than a kingly crown
    I would be, what you term, tied down;
    Tied down to dancing eyes and charms,
    Held fast by chubby, dimpled arms,
    The fettered slave of girl and boy,
    And win from them earth's finest joy."



  11. Wise Little Children
    Poet: Helen Hunt Jackson


    Oh! the blessed and wise little children,
    What sensible things they say!
    When they can't have the things they wish for,
    They take others and cry, "Let's play!"

    Oh! the blessed and wise little children,
    What sensible things they say!
    And we might be as happy as they are,
    If we would be happy this way.

    What odds, 'twixt not having and having,
    When we have lived out our day:
    Let us borrow the children's watchword -
    The magical watchword, "Let's play!"



  12. The Path O'Little Children
    Poet: Edgar A. Guest


    The path o' little children — there peaceful dreams come true,
    There sunshine's always streaming and every sky is blue,
    There each one loves the other, and every one is fair,
    And cheeks are pink with beauty, and singing fills the air.

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Famous Poets Featured in These Poems About Children:

Strickland Gillilan Poems   
Strickland Gillilan Poems


Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Poems  
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Poems


Edgar A. Guest Poems    
Edgar A. Guest Poems


Never underestimate the happiness and the love that a child will bring into the lives of others.  A child gives love and the love we feel for a child of our own is unconditional.  A well-known saying says it all: "A baby is a bit of stardust blown from the hand of God".  Share these poems with others who may enjoy reading what a child is!



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